Enchantment

That's it. It's what archetypes do. They autonomously, inconspicuously enchant the world as they appear in our lives.




Mermaid Grismere, Images

Mermaid Grismere, Image Poem

My work is an example of the Jungian process in action. As Jung states, “The symbolic process is an experience in images and of images.” The matter of archetypes extends into infinity and God. Working with archetypes is enlightening.


Each Poem is an opening through a symbol shaped door into a world of awareness, an entryway, like a rabbit hole or Oz. The poems are built with words, words that linger and drape as in the poem, Both Sides Now, or words in lengthy sentences streaming around a potter's wheel in the poem, Pottery, or a bunch of crinkly words gathered together to form a tutu in the poem, Ballerina, or words smattered as debris in a tornado in the poem, Whirlwind.


Grismere, A Magician Archetype


Queen, Goddess, Mother Nature, the quintessential Feminine Soul Archetype is a Diva! As all archetypes, the feminine soul archetype is duplicitous. She has an opposite side. The feminine soul image is a bundle of feminine attributes and characteristics, good and bad, qualities and drawbacks, that are found in both women and men. At opposite ends of the continuum, the kind and beautiful mermaid becomes a deadly, matted sea witch.


The mermaid archetype is enchanted and has "magical" abilities, such as spells and sorcery (both good & evil). Mermaid Grismere transforms into a "Magical" Genie, not by will or imagination but by the image's particular design. See the Video. Motifs associated with mermaids change, but a mermaid is a mermaid by any name. The original poetry image of Grismere remains the same as shape and symbol tell the story.


“No river contains a spirit, no tree is the life principle of man, no snake the embodiment of wisdom, no mountain caves the home of a great demon. No voices now speak to man from stones, plants, and animals, nor does he speak to them believing they can hear. His contact with nature has gone, and with it has gone the profound emotional energy that this symbolic connection supplied” (Jung, 1964, p. 85).


Through metaphors and symbolism, Nature creates communication. We project on nature, and we project on people. People in our lives have sets of characteristics we like, or don't like, about ourselves. When we attribute our own inner states to others, we project on them. Projection becomes a mirror for us, even when we're unaware. Through projection, we cast our weaknesses and strengths on others. There are better ways-- to have less inclination to project on others as we make our way closer to integration and wholeness.


Different Dragon, Same Archetype


Imagine a rollicking red dragon in a street parade at a Chinese New Year's celebration. The energy may include fierceness, struggle, happiness and excitement. Now imagine a toy dragon with the personality of a popular children's story or a song like "Puff the Magic Dragon." Another motif connected to the toy-like dragon archetype is identification with the dragon (the dragon is caring, noble and wise). Taming the dragon is a common theme.


And then there are dreaded evil Dragons, of course. The fierce and fiery dragon is destructive, merciless, random, and uncontainable. In modern Christianity, the dragon is a symbol of the anti-Christ. The evil dragon symbolizes the devil.


The Devil Archetype, purely evil, with no redemptive value, a prototype with the ability to severely damage and shape behavior.


Archetypal images and themes manifest over and over again in different ways throughout the lives of all people. They are ever present energies acting behind the scenes. We may act with the heartiness of a pirate or the whimsy of a mermaid, the grace of a queen, or the lowliness of a pauper.

The Book of Dragons

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